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Data sufficiency in Reasoning covers many different topics of Reasoning section. In this topic, a question is followed by two or three statements and a candidate needs to determine whether a question can be solved by any of the statements, using a combination of statements or no statement can be used to solving the question.
 
You just need to check on whether the data which has been provided is sufficient to help you solve the required question. Since a variety of questions can be framed from this topic, one needs to be an active reader and go through every statement carefully.
 
A number of competitive exams feature questions related to the topic and can range from anywhere between 3-5 questions in the reasoning section.
 
Exams, where these type of questions are asked, include IBPS PO, IBPS SO, IBPS Clerk, SBI Clerk, SBI PO, IBPS RRB, RBI Grade B, RBI Assistant, LIC etc.


Data Sufficiency Questions PDF:

Data Sufficiency PDF Set 1


Data sufficiency in the reasoning section covers topics such as coding-decoding, sitting arrangement, order & ranking, blood relation, alphabetical series etc.
 
These questions require you to learn the concept related to topics of reasoning and then apply the knowledge to see if the mentioned statements can be used to solve the question. In the case of data sufficiency, we don’t need to find the answer rather we need to analyse the given data and decide whether it is sufficient to provide us with an answer.
 

Understanding Answer Statements of Data sufficiency Questions


Data sufficiency problems comprise of statements which can be two or three in number and each has certain information. You’ll need to decide whether the information present in the statements sync with what is being asked.
 
Data sufficiency Question’s options are given as:
 
1. The answer can be obtained from Statement I alone but statement II alone is not sufficient to answer the question;
 
2. The answer can be obtained from statement II alone but the statement I alone is not sufficient to answer the question;
 
3. The answer can be obtained from both statements I and II together, but neither statement I nor statement II alone is sufficient to answer the question;
 
4. Both the statements combined are not sufficient to answer the question

 
For example:
 
Directions: Here is following consists of a question and two statements numbered I and II given below it. You have to decide whether the data provided in the statements are sufficient to answer the question.
 
7 books namely Book 1, Book 2, Book 3, Book 4, Book 5, Book 6 and Book 7 are of different weights. Find the second lightest book?
 
Statement I: Book 1 is heavier than Book 4, which is just lighter than Book 3. Book 2 is not the lightest. Book 5 is just heavier than Book 3.
 
Statement II: Book 3 is heavier than only two books. Book 7 is just heavier than Book 1, which is heavier than Book 4. Book 4 is lighter than Book 3.


A. If the data in statement I is sufficient to answer the question.

B. If the data in statement II is sufficient to answer the question.

C. If the data in either statement I or statement II is sufficient to answer the question.

D. If the data in both statement I and statement II is necessary to answer the question.

E. If the data in neither statement I nor statement II is sufficient to answer the question.


Ans. D
 
7 books namely Book 1, Book 2, Book 3, Book 4, Book 5, Book 6 and Book 7 are of different weights.
 
Find the second lightest book?
 
Statement I: Book 1 is heavier than Book 4, which is just lighter than Book 3. Book 2 is not the lightest. Book 5 is just heavier than Book 3.
 
Statement II:  Book 3 is heavier than only two books. Book 7 is just heavier than Book 1, which is heavier than Book 4. Book 4 is lighter than Book 3.
 
Checking statement I:
 
Following arrangement can be prepared with the given hints:
 
Book 1 > Book 5 > Book 3 > Book 4
 
But we cannot find the second lightest book because we don’t have information for all the books.
 
Hence data in statement I alone is not sufficient to answer the question.
 
Checking statement II:
 
Following arrangement can be prepared with the given hints:
 
Book 3> Book 4 > __ or  Book 3 > __ > Book 4
 
Thus Book 4 could be or could not be the second lightest book.
 
Hence data in statement II alone is not sufficient to answer the question.
 
Checking statements I and II:
 
Statement I: Book 1 is heavier than Book 4, which is just lighter than Book 3. Book 2 is not the lightest. Book 5 is just heavier than Book 3.
 
Statement II:  Book 3 is heavier than only two books. Book 7 is just heavier than Book 1, which is heavier than Book 4. Book 4 is lighter than Book 3.
 
Using the hints given in italics, we can have the following arrangement.
 
Book 1> Book 3 > Book 4 > __
 
Thus we can determine Book 4 to be the second lightest book.
 
Hence data in both the statements is necessary to answer the question.
 
Hence option D is correct.

 
In the above example, we need to find out the second lightest book.
 
So, as per Statement 1, we’ll need to look at the variables present and then rank accordingly in order to see whether they are able to provide us with the answer.
 
If, while solving the variables in Statement 2, we are able to get the answer then, the answer will be either Statement 1 or Statement 2 is sufficient to answer the question.
 
Similarly, applying other concepts of reasoning, one can solve these type of questions.
 

Tricks for Data sufficiency Questions


1. Examine the Data sufficiency Questions:
 
It is important to understand what is being asked in the question. It can be a position, a place, a direction etc. Make sure you understand what the question is asking. Then consider what information is required to be needed to answer the question.
 
2. Consider every statement individually in Data sufficiency Questions:
 
After you have figured out the nature of the question and decided what information is required to answer it, look at each of the statements which have been provided. Consider them one at a time, without reference to each other.
 
First look at statement A. Does it provide enough information to answer the question? If so, you’ve already narrowed the possible answer choices to just one.
 
Then look at the second statement, is it enough information to answer the question. If so, both the answer statements may be possible. If neither statement by itself is sufficient to answer the question, go on to the third stage.
 
3. Combine the statements of Data sufficiency Questions:
 
The third step requires you to combine the two statements. If neither of the statements is itself sufficient to answer the question, consider the case where you can answer by combining the information. If it is not so, then the question cannot be answered, even after a combination of statements.